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Entries in kitchen (19)

Monday
Aug062007

Jamaican Food in 2000 A.D. (1969)

The December 4, 1969 Daily Gleaner (Kingston, Jamaica) ran a piece by James MacDonald titled, "Food in 2000 A.D." that examined the food of the future within the context of Jamaican beef imports and communal eating.

It is interesting to note that the communal kitchen concept was very much in vogue in the late nineteenth century (see Looking Backward by Edward Bellamy) and seemed to make a comeback in the 1960s and 70s. Below are excerpts from the piece.

Milk that never saw a cow, fruit that never grew on a tree or in the ground, and steak bearing no relation to a bullock -- in other words, fabricated food. It sounds a little distasteful and perhaps unbelievable but, according to eminent scientists studying food science it is inevitable and will be soon on our tables.

Take the steak for instance. Soya beans can be woven to resemble a bullock's muscle, the fat presents no problem nor do vitamins, colouring is simple and flavour can be injected to order. The stuff can be even made to suit the taste buds of an institutional canteen or those who like to see blood.

The development is not a new one - vegetarian Seventh Day Adventists have been eating this type of meat for the past forty years - but it is developing rapidly in recent years, and could hang a large question mark over the future of beef herds. Here in Jamaica it might solve the problem we have of having to import so much beef though I doubt if a patty would ever taste the same again.

Food Technologists also forecast the days of communal feeding, when whole sections of the community, several streets joined together, would be served by a communal kitchen. Mrs. Community, tired of her cooking chores, will simply pick up the phone and order any variety of quality convenience foods from the self-serving central chef. An indication of this trend is visible at the moment in the home delivery services of some restaurants and also the ready to heat TV Dinners. Quality at the moment may leave a lot to be desired but in the future, new methods of keeping food such as A.F.D. (Accelerated Freeze Drying) and cooking Infra-Ray Ovens will keep the gourmets happy. The result - less time spent on cooking and shopping and more time for leisure.

See also:
That Synthetic Food of the Future (Ogden Standard-Examiner, 1926)
Food of the Future (Indiana Progress, 1896)
Delicious Waste Liquids of the Future (1982)

Monday
Jul232007

House of the Future for the Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition (1956)

The photos and excerpts below are featured in the book Fifties Source Book and highlight the Kitchen of the Future built for the 1956 Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition.


Peter and Alison Smithson were major exponents of Modernist architecture in Britain, commissioned to design the House of the Future for the 1956 Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition. The house was an exercise in futurist design, built of pre-fabricated plastic. The Smithsons admired the manufacturing methods of the American auto industry. The mass production-based industries had already revolutionized half the house - the kitchen, bathroom, laundry room and garage. The architects advocated using factory-built, fitted kitchen units which could be easily updated. The House of the Future took the concept of flexibility beyond conventional open plan with only the kitchen and bathroom modules differentiated from the rest. An electrostatic dust collector was provided and cooking utensils incorporated their own heating elements. It was ideas such as these that impressed visitors to the exhibition rather than the building itself, with no external windows.

See also:
1999 A.D. (1967)
Monsanto House of the Future (1957-1967)
Frigidaire Kitchen of the Future (1957)

Thursday
Jun142007

Frigidaire Kitchen of the Future (1957)


The blog Mutagenic Mushroom recently posted this photo of the 1957 kitchen of the future. I can't tell where they found it but they claim it was produced by Frigidaire. Anyone with more information about this image is encouraged to fill us in.

See also:
1999 A.D. (1967)
Monsanto House of the Future (1957-1967)

Monday
May212007

After the War (1944)

Associated Press Woman's Editor Dorothy Roe included a poem in her 1944 article about the kitchen of the future. I found the article in the March 20, 1944 Charleston Gazette (Charleston, West Virginia) and the poem is transcribed below.

After the war . . .
We'll just a press a button for food or for drink,
For washing the dishes or cleaning the sink.
We'll ride in a rocket instead of a car.
And life will be streamlined . . .
After the war.

After reading the entire article, which we'll look at later this week, you can tell that Roe attempts to put the hopes of post-war America into perspective and let people know that we may not be headed for a push-button future after all.

See also:
1999 A.D. (1967)
Call a Serviceman (Chicago Tribune, 1959)
Something must be wrong with its radar eye! (Chicago Tribune, 1959)
Monsanto House of the Future (1957-1967)
'Summer Terrace' All Year Round (1960s)

Sunday
Apr292007

1999 A.D. (1967)


Split second lunches, color-keyed disposable dishes, all part of the instant society of tomorrow. A society rich in leisure and taken-for-granted comforts.

In 1967 the Philco-Ford Corporation released a short film titled 1999 A.D. In it the inevitable advances of the future are demonstrated. This clip of the kitchen of the future showcases a world of automation, maximized health, and a push-button culture; themes we see throughout the film.



Like the film Future Shock, you can find 1999 A.D. on the DVD Yesterday's Tomorrows Today, released by A/V Geeks.

See also:
Call a Serviceman (Chicago Tribune, 1959)
Monsanto House of the Future (1957-1967)

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